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Black News and News Makers in History: James Banning

Black news from Pasadena - Black News and News Makers in History - celebrating James Banning this week in Black historyJames Banning, first Black aviator to obtain a license from the U.S. Department of Commerce, dared to live his dream and succeeded.

Born November 5, 1899, James Herman Banning was from Oklahoma. The family moved to Ames in 1919, where he studied electrical engineering at Iowa State College for a little more than a year. Dreaming from boyhood of being a pilot, Banning was repeatedly turned away from flight schools due to racial restrictions. He eventually learned to fly from an army aviator at Raymond Fisher's Flying Field in Des Moines.

He became the first Black aviator to obtain a license from the U. S. Department of Commerce.

Banning also operated the J. H. Banning Auto Repair Shop in Ames from 1922 to 1928.

He left Iowa for Los Angeles in 1929 where he was the chief pilot for the Bessie Coleman Aero Club. There he became a demonstration pilot flying a biplane named "Miss Ames," named after the Midwest town.

In 1932, Banning and another Black pilot, Thomas C. Allen became the first Blacks to fly coast-to-coast from Los Angeles to Long Island, NY. Using a plane pieced together from junkyard parts, they made the 3,300 mile trip in less than 42 hours in the air. However, the trip actually required 21 days to complete because the pilots had to raise money each time they stopped.

In 1933, James Banning was killed in a plane crash during an air show in San Diego. He was a passenger in a biplane flown by a Navy pilot, which stalled and entered an unrecoverable spin in front of hundreds of horrified spectators.

Compiled from http://earlyaviators.com/ebanning.htm.

 
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