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Health & Lifestyle

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Why Bad Breath Complaints Heat Up in the Summertime

Eliminating the Cause of Malodor is Far Better than Covering It Up, Oral Care Scientist Says

Whether it's a picnic, beach day, family gathering or a night out with friends, summer is a time when people come together for fun.

Unfortunately, there is often a fly in the ointment when embracing the "fun season" – higher gas prices, forgetting your sunscreen, waiting in line for the rollercoaster, or that great social buzz kill, bad breath.

"For a significant number of people bad breath, also called halitosis, is an unnecessary embarrassment caused by malodorant sulfur compounds created by putrefying bacteria in your mouth, primarily in crevices of your tongue," says Dr. Bob Kross, the oral care scientist and inventor who created the Breath Appeal products (www.breathappeal.com) that eliminate the excess odor causing bacteria.

"Normal amounts of these bacteria will hardly affect your breath at all, but excessive levels can lead to bad breath and other serious oral problems," Kross says.

"You don't have to have a chronic condition for bad breath to be a problem," he says. "Summer is full of breath busters!"

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Summer Pet Safety Tips

It's hard to beat the heat this time of year even with easy access to air conditioning, icy drinks and refreshing swimming pools. Imagine how our furry friends feel in the sweltering summer when they're dependent on us for protection from the high temperatures and the sun's sizzling rays.

"Heat stroke can occur when an animal's temperature rises to a critical level," said Dr. Michael Dix, medical director for Best Friends Animal Society. "Normal body temperatures for dogs and cats range from 100 to 102.5 degrees. When a dog's temperature rises to 108 degrees, or a cat's to 106 degrees, they can suffer irreparable organ damage and even die."

According to Dix, signs of heat stroke include heavy panting that does not resolve as the pet rests, increasing distress, a tongue color that is dark red to almost purple, weakness or collapse, hyper-salivation, vomiting and labored breathing.

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